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Final Evaluation of CaLP Activities in the MENA Region

Final Evaluation of CaLP Activities in the MENA Region

Cash Learning Partnership (CaLP), MENA Region

 

CaLP has been operating its Middle East and North Africa Office in Amman, Jordan since 2017. In 2018, CaLP received funding from the German Federal Foreign Office (GFFO) to support further expansion of regional presence that would facilitate more intensive engagement on capacity building, research and knowledge management, coordination support, and policy and advocacy objectives. Meraki Labs was commissioned to complete a final evaluation of the CaLP's overall contribution to building an enabling environment for CVA programming in the region and more broadly. The evaluation assessed past project objectives, not only in light of the MENA context and project aims, but also rapid shifts in context. In order to best serve CaLP's agenda, the evaluation was focused on assessing approach as compared to the new global strategic plan for the 2020-2025 period.

 

 

Displacement in Northeast South Sudan and the borderlands

Displacement in Northeast South Sudan and the borderlands

Danish Demining Group, South Sudan

 

 In order to implement conflict-sensitive peacebuilding and resilience programming in Northeast South Sudan, the Danish Demining Group (DDG) needed to develop an evidence base on current issues and dynamics driving displacement along the South Sudan-Ethiopian borderlands. This project included conducting primary qualitative research in Pibor County  to conduct a contextual analysis of communities, conducting a root causes analysis, evaluating cross-border policies and practices affecting resilience and economic wellbeing of communities, and mapping existing community-based resilience factors and peacebuilding processes and initiatives. Following the research, Meraki Labs supported DDG in developing a project concept and accompanying theory of change. 

 

Women’s Experiences as Transit Migrants in Yemen

Women’s Experiences as Transit Migrants in Yemen

International Organization for Migration, Yemen

 

 

In 2019, women and girls formed 21% of migrants travelling irregularly from the Horn of Africa to Gulf countries; the majority of these women were from Ethiopia. Existing research provides anecdotal evidence that irregular migration journeys are gendered, highlighting that women face specific issues that are distinct from the overall risks of the journey.

In this gender study, Meraki Labs has examined the risks faced by Ethiopian women on the irregular migration route to the Gulf, and the factors that affect their vulnerability to trafficking.

  

 

Analysis of Return Migrant Reintegration in Ethiopia

Analysis of Return Migrant Reintegration in Ethiopia

NORWEGIAN REFUGEE COUNCIL, ETHIOPIA

Meraki Labs was commissioned to conduct primary research to support the Norwegian Refugee Council to analyse the gap in the governmental, private sectors and humanitarian response to return migrant needs in Ethiopia. This included a review of policy frameworks, existing literature on root causes of migration and existing programming, as well as a stakeholder analysis at different levels.

In additional to a literature review and a legal and policy analysis, Meraki Labs conducted 104 interviews with returnees, families of returnees, and government officials in Oromia, Amhara, and Addis Ababa Regions of Ethiopia as well as 20 additional interviews with migrants in Saudi Arabia, Sudan, and Djibouti. The findings report was aimed at providing detailed and realistic recommendations for protection, livelihoods, and education programming.

Final Evaluation of the Mediterranean Mixed Migration (3M) Response Programme

Final Evaluation of the Mediterranean Mixed Migration (3M) Response Programme

3M CONSORTIUM (DRC, IRC, START NETWORK)

LIBYA, NIGER, MALI, TUNISIA, BURKINA FASO

3M was a three-year FCDO-funded migration response programme led by a consortium of the Danish Refugee Council (DRC), International Rescue Committee (IRC), the Start Network and the Mixed Migration Center (North and West Africa). The programme was operational in Mali, Niger, Libya, Tunisia, and Burkina Faso – with additional reach provided by Migration Emergency Response Facility (MERF) grants provided by the Start Network.

Meraki Labs was commissioned to complete a final evaluation of the programme, with the overall objective of this assignment is to support the 3M migration program to assess to what extent the project has contributed to its overall objective and achieved its results, and to evaluate if the project’s approach (design and implementation) was the right strategy. Meraki Labs used a traditional OECD DAC evaluation approach, combined with an in-depth theory of change review, value for money assessment, and modified the effectiveness assessment to correspond with a routes-based approach framework.

Recommendations to the UN Humanitarian Country Team – Cash and Humanitarian Response

Recommendations to the UN Humanitarian Country Team – Cash and Humanitarian Response

CASH LEARNING PARTNERSHIP, YEMEN

Cash transfers in Yemen, delivered through humanitarian actors and social protection systems, offer great opportunities for beneficiary impact and alignment with donor priorities – but this potential is not fully utilized due to fragmentation within the system. Fragmentation may affect the degree to which cash programs in Yemen can be scaled up.


Meraki Labs, on behalf of the Cash and Learning Partnership, conducted independent research into the barriers and opportunities to harmonise humanitarian and social protection cash programs. The end result is a paper which presents options to the HCT and donors.

Recommendation to UN Humanitarian Country Team – Social Protection Integration

Recommendation to UN Humanitarian Country Team – Social Protection Integration

CASH LEARNING PARTNERSHIP, IRAQ

In Iraq, state social protection programmes are a critical component of household income. For the last seven years, communities have also benefited from ongoing humanitarian cash-based support to meet emergency needs. As the humanitarian response to the ISIL crisis winds down, several initiatives for linking humanitarian and social protection systems have been initiated, but none have been sustained or gained sufficient buy in from all stakeholders. The Covid-19 crisis has added a layer of urgency in finding a solution to poverty-focused cash-based social protection initiatives in Iraq.

Meraki Labs supported humanitarian, development, and government actors in understanding the extent to which humanitarian cash assistance and government-led social protection programmes overlap in Iraq, to determine a way forward to support vulnerable households in light of the Covid-19 pandemic, while considering the importance of ongoing recovery from conflict.

Protection Risks and Human Smuggling on the Eastern Migration Route

Protection Risks and Human Smuggling on the Eastern Migration Route

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR MIGRATION, YEMEN

Close to 150,000 migrants move from the Horn of Africa through Yemen to Gulf countries. Many migrants on this route face life threatening protection risks ranging from starvation to abduction by smugglers. However the ongoing civil war in Yemen has left limited space for humanitarian agencies to meet the needs of migrants given the scale of the humanitarian crisis within Yemeni communities.

Meraki Labs conducted research intended to support IOM in identifying major protection risks facing migrants, as well as coping mechanisms that migrants have adopted over time. Meraki Labs provided programming recommendations that account for the fragility of the context and the vulnerability of the target population.

Principled humanitarian assistance and non-State armed groups

Principled humanitarian assistance and non-State armed groups

Forced Migration Review, Online

 

The principles of humanity, impartiality, neutrality and independence are intended to enable, characterise and guide the delivery of humanitarian assistance. However, as conflicts grow more complex, interpretations of humanitarian principles are being questioned, particularly in areas under the control or influence of proscribed non-state armed groups (NSAGs). Delivery of aid in these areas may clash or be perceived to clash with principles of public accountability and transparency – principles which are paramount for many donor States.

   

“We are the ones they come to when nobody can help” Afghan smugglers’ perceptions of themselves and their communities

“We are the ones they come to when nobody can help” Afghan smugglers’ perceptions of themselves and their communities

International Organization for Migration, Migration Research Series No.56

 

Authored by Abdullah Mohammadi, Ruta Nimkar and Emily Savage, this publication in the Migration Research Series analyses the perceptions that Afghan smugglers have of themselves and of their relationships with their communities in Afghanistan. The paper is based on interviews with 23 smugglers in three sites in Afghanistan and considers community dynamics and low-level smugglers rather than high-level organizers of smuggling networks. It highlights that smuggling networks have a long-standing and respected place in Afghan culture. The paper also provides an analysis of factors that affect perceptions of and trust in smugglers among Afghan society. It concludes with some implications to support policy responses and programming concerning migrant smuggling and migration in Afghanistan.